Tag Archives: Review

The iPod of smoke detectors is here. From Nest.

Inside Nest Protect

The Nest team is back with their second product – a smoke detector which is connected with your smart sensor and uses the same software app to control it as their first, smart thermostat.

Nest Protect really resonates several product innovation features just like the iPod had done at this arrival. It does most things that a standard smoke detector does, but for example the button feature that allows you to deactivate it with a broom stick and a nifty night lamp. All these features add a soft personality, same way the ‘sleep’ light on the mac was a strong emotional feature for its owners back in the early 90s.  But out of all its features, this is my favourite: The Nest system draws its brainpower from sensors and artificial intelligence algorithms that capitalize on user behavior in ways no dumb thermostat could imagine. For example, Nest’s motion sensors can tell when people are around. After months of use in thousands of homes, the company has gleaned the fact that people who leave the house in the morning tend to be gone all day, while those who leave in the afternoon are more likely to return home more quickly. Thus the thermostat more intelligently applies the Auto-Away function, which is a big energy saver. One of the features I like less is ofcourse, like all Apple products, it is more than twice the price tag of smoke detectors. Hence, the iPod of …

Meet Nest Protect.

Read full WIRED article: Nest Gives the Lowly Smoke Detector a Brain — And a Voice | Wired Business | Wired.com.

Review: Leap Motion Controller | MIT Technology Review

Leap Motion Controller

MIT Tech Review plays with the Leap Motion Controller and unfortunate puns of ‘not leaping for joy’ are their verdict. However, Gesture control technology would enable a much easier, intuitive and gratifying way of interacting in the connected living room, especially for gaming, next generation video/audio interaction, etc. It seems that Leap needs to cover some further ground before it is going to deliver a seemless, instantly gratifying experience.

As someone who has Carpel Tunnel, I believe they ought to consider how gesture control would work in conjunction with other devices as this was the most worrying of all comments in the review:

“I also noticed something that doesn’t usually happen when using a mouse and keyboard, even though I’m routinely in front of a computer for seven or more hours a day: after an hour or so, my right arm felt really tired, all the way up to my shoulder. Even when I started fresh the next day, making motions as small and precise as I could, it still started to bug me after a while”

 

 

 

Review: Leap Motion Controller | MIT Technology Review.